#jiscel12 Conference Week

This is the final post of three about the JISC Innovating eLearning conference. The first post is on the practicalities of attending an online conference. The second post is on the sessions I attended in the pre-conference activity week.

This post is going to be formed mainly from images of my notes from each of the sessions I attended. I’ve recently invested in a stylus (the Bamboo from Wacom, if you’re interested) for my iPad and I’ve been using UPad for my note taking. I find it a much better way to write notes than typing as it allows a more fluid approach.

So, everything started with Dr Sue Black’s keynote, “Innovation, Innovation, Innovation”. It set the conference up well, through a narrative of her own experience with technology and education. The element of the talk that sticks in my mind most is the concept of failing fast. I am very aware that personally I need to get over the fear of failure and embrace it as a learning process.

Fast Fail

Next up was Mark Stubbs from Manchester Metropolitan University on “Organisational transformation and curriculum change”. For me this was probably the most thought provoking session. It got me thinking about organisational culture and reminded me of all the work on change management that I did as part of the Warwick Administrative Management Programme.

Curriculum Design

The mid-week keynote came from James Clay. I wrote a guest post early in the conference week on James’ Letters from the Edge blog, in this I talked about the number of questions I had whirling round in my head. James’s keynote only added to this number. Most interesting of all was the question around whether we need to publish research in the field of educational technology, if most of us will try things again and tweak them to meet the needs of our own institutions, even if they’ve failed elsewhere.

Levers of Change

The final session I attended was presented by Marion Manton, Alison Felce and Emma Purnell on “Lifelong learning in a digital age”. And in this there were yet more questions posed, but thankfully through looking at what each of their institutions had done we also got closer to some answers. Of particular interest to me, as someone who runs digital literacy programmes was how we make them successful and sustainable.

Lifelong Learning

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